“You See the Prophet Laid On Top of Me”: TON3X, Bishop Jackson, and Pentecostal Narratives on Body-to Body Prostration

Bishop Jackson’s Response Through the 2009 “Unspoken” recording, the artist formerly known as TON3X stimulated repressed conversation about longstanding peculiar narratives within Christian rituals. On the track “Sneeze,” in particular, TON3X explores the queer, homoerotic, and questionable nature of biblical rituals. The song is loosely based upon two similar Hebrew bible resurrection accounts involving the prophet Elijah (1 Kings 17:17-24)…

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The Color of Progress: The Need for the Development of Diverse Ministry Praxis

“The White establishment is now the minority.” These were the words that fell from the shockingly surprised and utterly stunned lips of noted conservative political pundit Bill O’ Reilly after witnessing the historical reelection of President Barack Obama for a second term. Our political process often bequeaths to us significant moments that are ripe for our theological inquiry. In this…

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A Black Church Going Green

  While we encourage our congregations to thank God for creation, we must also become involved in the gratitude. It is through the intentional teaching, preaching, care and advocacy that clergy honors God for creation. If the church desires to remain a transformative force for generations to come, it must get serious about preserving resources. God’s house must care for…

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Two Nations Under God

          “I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America…one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”                         Alas, the many months leading to our elections gravely affirms there are two nations under God. Both divided, legalistically bound, and unclear (perhaps, intentionally) about God’s true meaning of justice. The schism is due not…

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Political Conventions, Protestant Revivals, and the Limits of Persuasion

By William Yoo (Ph.D Candidate, Emory University) On September 10, 2012, the Washington Post published an article asking whether political conventions have outlived their usefulness with opinions from politicians and strategists in both parties.  In the last week of August, thousands of Republican delegates inundated Tampa to attend their convention.  They heard countless speeches that trumpeted the virtues of their…

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Christian Scholars’ Conference Review

By James W. McCarty III (Ph.D. Candidate, Emory University) Historically, attempts at ecumenical and interreligious dialogue have focused on finding common ground, shared beliefs, or analogous practices as ways of bridging the divide between communities that have found themselves in conflict with, or at best suspicious of, each other. These meetings often conclude with trite affirmations of sameness or claims…

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I See Dead People: Holograms and Historicity

By Mark Jefferson (Ph.D. Student, Emory University) From a Christian perspective, death, in a grammatical sense, is not a period but a comma. It is not the culmination of one’s life but a transitory event. Pop culture, conversely, wrestles with the notion of death, particularly its finality, especially when considering the death of one of its heroes. Mortals always seek…

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The Field: A Korean Mission in Panama

by Haemin Lee (Ph.D. Candidate, Emory University) Global mission is definitely something special for many Korean Christians. There are currently about 20,000 overseas Korean missionaries working in 170 different countries. They engage in a wide spectrum of mission work that ranges from church planting to aid and development operation. Recently, my field research related to Christian mission took me to…

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In the Shadow of Empire: Exploring Ethnic Violence and the Disciplines on the Bosporus

By Joe Wiinikka-Lydon (Ph.D. Student, Emory University) In May I attended an international interdisciplinary symposium focused on ethnic conflict, sponsored by Sabanci University. Sabanci is a new university in Turkey, and though located outside Istanbul, the attendees were hosted in a small center owned by Sabanci in the Karakoy section of the city. The symposium’s location was well chosen on…

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A Question for the Vatican: Why Are You Making Our Noble Tradition Defective?

By Min-Ah Cho, Assistant Professor of Theology at St. Catherine University, St. Paul, MN On June 4th, the Vatican censured Sister Margaret A. Farley, because, according to the church hierarchy, her books are out of step with official church teaching on human sexuality. On April 18th, the Vatican’s Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith issued a report declaring that the…

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